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TERROR BYTES




Today, I got a call from my husband’s office that he was missing-had gone out of the office for some fresh air and never turned up. When I told them he hadn’t come home either, they reassured me that they would spare no efforts to find him.

***

To others, he was Dilraj Sekhar, a computer genius climbing the ladder of success-many steps at a go.
To me Anila, a copywriter, he was simply the loving and adorable Dil, who always found time for me in the midst of his codes and programs.

That’s why I was concerned when he started sporting a faraway, worried look in his brown eyes. When I tried to cheer him by complimenting his intellect, he shocked me by saying-quite uncharacteristically -that sometimes he wondered if ignorance weren’t indeed bliss.

I was now getting real worried. I wondered whether he was under heavy work stress, being a key man in his firm- an authority on AI, which seemed to be the hottest topic nowadays. But whenever I asked about AI, he would simply say, “I agree with Elon Musk-We are not ready for AI.”

***

My joy was boundless when I saw my Dilraj at the door. After hugging and kissing, I said, “Got to inform our folks…,” “No need!” he snapped sharply, snatching the phone from my hands.

It was after hearing the unfamiliar metallic voice that I noticed in horror the blue robotic eyes of my Artificial Dilraj.
***





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