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AS ‘LUCK’ WOULD HAVE IT.


“Did you pray?” asked dad, when Ramesh was getting ready for the interview. He had applied for an accountant’s position in a private firm.

“Yes dad, now let me hurry, it’s getting late,” said Ramesh, and got down from the lift of his multi story apartment and paused for a second below his apartment block to make sure he hadn’t forgotten anything. 

He was wearing black pants and a bright white shirt, neatly pressed for this special occasion.

Unknown to him, in another flat in the same complex, ‘House warming’ ceremony had just taken place. A reluctant cow had been brought all the way to the fourth floor, as it is considered auspicious.

The function just completed, some nearby residents wanted the cow dung in the corridor to be disposed off immediately, brooking no delay. The harried maid who had been working since early hours thought it fit to just fling it down, exactly where Ramesh was standing that time.

 Thus it was that the enraged Ramesh got a cowdung splotch on his white shirt front. Since it was already late, he thought it prudent to inform his interviewers of his predicament and buy some time.

Meanwhile, the M.D of the recruiting firm, who was personally interviewing the candidates was getting frustrated that no candidate so far was matching his expectations. A great believer in auspicious signs and times, he wanted to see some auspicious sign while recruiting for such a key post.

“Sir”, said his secretary, “A candidate called Ramesh just called...he said he got delayed a bit...”

“What’s the use of a guy who can’t arrive punctually even for his interview?” thundered the boss.

“Sir, it appears that cow dung fell on his dress accidentally when he had just started….”

“What! Cow dung on his dress! Sooooo auspicious!!!” said the M.D and added, “Call him and tell him he is recruited,”

“But sir…” started the secretary.

“No buts, just do as I say,” said the M.D

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LINGUA-WOES

A Tamil gentleman nearly got clobbered when he appreciated the food served for lunch at his Telugu friend’s place.

The poor guy innocently said ‘Pramadham’ which means ‘Excellent’ in Tamil, but unfortunately means ‘Danger’ in Telugu!

‘Tamasha’ means ‘light stuff’, ‘Comedy’ etc in Malayalam, but beware if you use it flippantly with the Hindi speaking people.

Indiscreet use of this word- which means a street dance or something in Hindi- is not received kindly by them.

The simple word ‘Avasar’- which also is a Sanskrit root word- means ‘Occasion’ in Hindi; ‘Avasaram’ means ‘Requirement’ in Telugu; ‘Opportunity’ in Malayalam and ‘Hurry’ in Tamil!

There must of course be several such examples in the various languages ‘spooken’ in our delightful India.




RIGHT WRONG

Seeing her eyes glow in excitement,
Obviously though she has it all wrong,
I rush to grab the correction opportunity,

Till I have another look at the gleam in her eyes.

Hell, I think, let me be wrong a hundred times over,
If only to preserve that glorious joy,

Rather than prove her wrong
And watch her enthusiasm wither.

THULABARAM

There is, in the Lord's Abode in Guruvayoor,
A common balance for weighment of offerings.

It's called Thulabaram.

Only, it is anything but common.

A priest there is entrusted the task
Of weighing the offerings you committed
To Lord Krishna.

It may be a few kilos of some vegetable
Or fruit, grains or sugar or what you will.


But it got to be necessarily what you committed!

For,

Have seen with my own eyes
The priest struggling to weigh
A couple of kilos or maybe three
Of a certain vegetable, think it was yam.

But it simply wouldn't balance, though he
Kept on heaping the yam on it!

Then, on the priest's asking,
The devotee said he had thought
Of a different vegetable, maybe raw banana,

But had settled for yam since he couldn't
Get the banana.

The priest quickly removed the yam
Asked the devotee to be back
With the vegetable committed!

Only then, the priest said with conviction,

The weighment would happen.