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A GET -TOGETHER.


One day, I happened to see a group of teenagers in our local club. Seeing one or two familiar faces, I casually walked up to them to see what they were up to.

“Hi uncle!” said familiar face.  I hi..ed back and asked him what was supposed to be going on.

“A get together, uncle,” said another slightly familiar teen with a bored look and promptly lost interest in me.

 One of the boys seemed to be hitched or connected at the ear, head etc to many contraptions. I was alarmed as he appeared totally motionless. “Is he er… breathing? “ I asked one of them.

“He is listening to music, uncle!” answered one among them, in exasperation. The others looked at me wonderingly as if I was an inmate just escaped from Jurassic park.

“You said it is a get together!” I pointed out. “Yes it is, uncle, are you not seeing?”

What I was seeing was another teen, a girl, typing something feverishly on her ‘smart’ phone. She was ‘what’s apping’, I was coldly informed. A third one was chatting, another was chirping, all on their respective smarties.

 The gathered friends seemed to be totally oblivious of each other’s presence.

What was not happening-, as my Jurassic self could observe was- any tete-a tete, or communication among those gathered.

Before I left, I saw one poor young chap- looking lonely though in the middle of the group -armed with an outdated button mobile and apparently waiting for the others to be done with their activities.

Though it was none of my business, I was nevertheless tempted to ask, “What are you doing, my boy?”

Before he could answer, I said, “Oh I know! Get together.”  



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The poor guy innocently said ‘Pramadham’ which means ‘Excellent’ in Tamil, but unfortunately means ‘Danger’ in Telugu!

‘Tamasha’ means ‘light stuff’, ‘Comedy’ etc in Malayalam, but beware if you use it flippantly with the Hindi speaking people.

Indiscreet use of this word- which means a street dance or something in Hindi- is not received kindly by them.

The simple word ‘Avasar’- which also is a Sanskrit root word- means ‘Occasion’ in Hindi; ‘Avasaram’ means ‘Requirement’ in Telugu; ‘Opportunity’ in Malayalam and ‘Hurry’ in Tamil!

There must of course be several such examples in the various languages ‘spooken’ in our delightful India.




RIGHT WRONG

Seeing her eyes glow in excitement,
Obviously though she has it all wrong,
I rush to grab the correction opportunity,

Till I have another look at the gleam in her eyes.

Hell, I think, let me be wrong a hundred times over,
If only to preserve that glorious joy,

Rather than prove her wrong
And watch her enthusiasm wither.

TEACHINGS FROM THE ETERNAL SONG, THE BHAGVAD GITA

THE MANY WAYS TO PRAY TO THE LORD

Lord Krishna is infinitely merciful.

He accepts your prayers whatever be your way, or whomsoever you worship. Like the waters of all rivers leading to the Ocean, all prayers flow to Him alone. ( Rig Veda)

He says that you may, if you can, fix your mind and intellect on him and be always in His contemplation. That is the path of Knowledge or Jnana Yoga.

However, if you find it difficult, you may choose the path of Yoga practice. In this the mind can be trained to meditate on Him and be brought back again and again when it gets distracted. This is the path of Raja Yoga.

If you find the Yoga path cumbersome, you may resort to ritualistic worship as authorized by the sacred texts. This is the path of Karma Yoga. If your mind is not on rituals, you can take refuge in him, leading a self controlled life.

Then there is the Bhakti path, the path of total devotion and surrender to the Lord. Even here, the Lord says, you need not make elaborate offerings- A l…