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A GET -TOGETHER.


One day, I happened to see a group of teenagers in our local club. Seeing one or two familiar faces, I casually walked up to them to see what they were up to.

“Hi uncle!” said familiar face.  I hi..ed back and asked him what was supposed to be going on.

“A get together, uncle,” said another slightly familiar teen with a bored look and promptly lost interest in me.

 One of the boys seemed to be hitched or connected at the ear, head etc to many contraptions. I was alarmed as he appeared totally motionless. “Is he er… breathing? “ I asked one of them.

“He is listening to music, uncle!” answered one among them, in exasperation. The others looked at me wonderingly as if I was an inmate just escaped from Jurassic park.

“You said it is a get together!” I pointed out. “Yes it is, uncle, are you not seeing?”

What I was seeing was another teen, a girl, typing something feverishly on her ‘smart’ phone. She was ‘what’s apping’, I was coldly informed. A third one was chatting, another was chirping, all on their respective smarties.

 The gathered friends seemed to be totally oblivious of each other’s presence.

What was not happening-, as my Jurassic self could observe was- any tete-a tete, or communication among those gathered.

Before I left, I saw one poor young chap- looking lonely though in the middle of the group -armed with an outdated button mobile and apparently waiting for the others to be done with their activities.

Though it was none of my business, I was nevertheless tempted to ask, “What are you doing, my boy?”

Before he could answer, I said, “Oh I know! Get together.”  



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